Friday, March 20, 2020

Free Essays on And Then There Were None

And Then There Were None / Identity Murder mysteries are a type of literature/film which always contain a storyline which keeps the reader/viewer on the edge of their seat. Suspense, action, horror, and drama are all elements which add to the perfect murder mystery. These types of stories, when done right, take your mind on a thrill ride that doesn’t let up until the end in a dramatic plot twist that leaves the reader/viewer baffled and intrigued. This is the case in the story And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie and the film Identity, written by Michael Cooney. â€Å"Identity is just what you want a horror-thriller to be: energetic, lurid, tense and, above all, unpredictable." Marshall Fine, JOURNAL NEWS (WESTCHESTER, NY). Amazon.com claims And Then There Were None to be â€Å"considered the best mystery novel ever written†. AudioFile.com described it as being â€Å"..Agatha Christie at her best with her classic drawing room murder mystery with extra tension to boot†. Both these stories a re similar in that they keep you hooked to the point you can’t do anything but read on or keep viewing. Amazon.com claims Identity is â€Å"a tasty blend of And Then There Were None and Psycho, with a dash of Sybil for extra spice and psychosis†. They also coined it as â€Å"a thriller with a twist, its one of the most original to come around in a long time†. Both these stories deal with a â€Å"who did it† type of plot where the killer isn’t revealed until the very end, to the reader/viwers dismay. These stories are best for those who enjoy being intrigued by what happened, what could happen and what shouldn’t happen. The more you read or view on, the more you come to find whether your predictions were precise or whether they were off. Identity is a dark, disturbing film about 10 strangers that wind up having to spend the night at a hotel once a storm causes a flash flood to block the roads out. It is set in the middle of the desert, a... Free Essays on And Then There Were None Free Essays on And Then There Were None / Identity And Then There Were None / Identity Murder mysteries are a type of literature/film which always contain a storyline which keeps the reader/viewer on the edge of their seat. Suspense, action, horror, and drama are all elements which add to the perfect murder mystery. These types of stories, when done right, take your mind on a thrill ride that doesn’t let up until the end in a dramatic plot twist that leaves the reader/viewer baffled and intrigued. This is the case in the story And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie and the film Identity, written by Michael Cooney. â€Å"Identity is just what you want a horror-thriller to be: energetic, lurid, tense and, above all, unpredictable." Marshall Fine, JOURNAL NEWS (WESTCHESTER, NY). Amazon.com claims And Then There Were None to be â€Å"considered the best mystery novel ever written†. AudioFile.com described it as being â€Å"..Agatha Christie at her best with her classic drawing room murder mystery with extra tension to boot†. Both these stories a re similar in that they keep you hooked to the point you can’t do anything but read on or keep viewing. Amazon.com claims Identity is â€Å"a tasty blend of And Then There Were None and Psycho, with a dash of Sybil for extra spice and psychosis†. They also coined it as â€Å"a thriller with a twist, its one of the most original to come around in a long time†. Both these stories deal with a â€Å"who did it† type of plot where the killer isn’t revealed until the very end, to the reader/viwers dismay. These stories are best for those who enjoy being intrigued by what happened, what could happen and what shouldn’t happen. The more you read or view on, the more you come to find whether your predictions were precise or whether they were off. Identity is a dark, disturbing film about 10 strangers that wind up having to spend the night at a hotel once a storm causes a flash flood to block the roads out. It is set in the middle of the desert, a... Free Essays on And Then There Were None / Identity And Then There Were None / Identity Murder mysteries are a type of literature/film which always contain a storyline which keeps the reader/viewer on the edge of their seat. Suspense, action, horror, and drama are all elements which add to the perfect murder mystery. These types of stories, when done right, take your mind on a thrill ride that doesn’t let up until the end in a dramatic plot twist that leaves the reader/viewer baffled and intrigued. This is the case in the story And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie and the film Identity, written by Michael Cooney. â€Å"Identity is just what you want a horror-thriller to be: energetic, lurid, tense and, above all, unpredictable." Marshall Fine, JOURNAL NEWS (WESTCHESTER, NY). Amazon.com claims And Then There Were None to be â€Å"considered the best mystery novel ever written†. AudioFile.com described it as being â€Å"..Agatha Christie at her best with her classic drawing room murder mystery with extra tension to boot†. Both these stories a re similar in that they keep you hooked to the point you can’t do anything but read on or keep viewing. Amazon.com claims Identity is â€Å"a tasty blend of And Then There Were None and Psycho, with a dash of Sybil for extra spice and psychosis†. They also coined it as â€Å"a thriller with a twist, its one of the most original to come around in a long time†. Both these stories deal with a â€Å"who did it† type of plot where the killer isn’t revealed until the very end, to the reader/viwers dismay. These stories are best for those who enjoy being intrigued by what happened, what could happen and what shouldn’t happen. The more you read or view on, the more you come to find whether your predictions were precise or whether they were off. Identity is a dark, disturbing film about 10 strangers that wind up having to spend the night at a hotel once a storm causes a flash flood to block the roads out. It is set in the middle of the desert, a...

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Renaissance Painter Elisabetta Sirani

Renaissance Painter Elisabetta Sirani Known for: Renaissance woman painter of religious and mythological themes; opened a studio for women artists Dates: January 8, 1638 - August 25, 1665 Occupation: Italian artist, painter, etcher, educator Places: Bologna, Italy Religion: Roman Catholic Family and Background Born and lived in Bologna (Italy)Father: Giovanni (Gian) Andrea SiraniSiblings: Barbara Sirani and Anna Maria Sirani, also artistically inclined More About Elisabetta Sirani One of three artists daughters of a Bolognese artist and teacher, Giovanni Sirani, Elisabetta Sirani had many artworks in her native Bologne to study, both classical and contemporary. She also traveled to Florence and Rome to study the paintings there. While some other girls in her Renaissance culture were taught painting, few had the opportunities for learning that she did. Encouraged by a mentor, Count Carlo Cesare Malvasia, she assisted her father in his teaching and studied with other instructors there. A few of her works began to sell, and it became clear that her talent was greater than her fathers. She painted not only quite well, but also quite quickly. Even so, Elisabetta might have remained no more than her fathers assistant, but he developed gout when she was 17, and her earnings were essential to the family. He may also have discouraged her marrying. Though she painted some portraits, many of her works dealt with religious and historical scenes. She often featured women. Shes known for paintings of the muse Melpomene, Delilah holding scissors, The Madonna of the Rose and several other Madonnas, Cleopatra, Mary Magdalene, Galatea, Judith, Portia, Cain, the biblical Michael, Saint Jerome, and others. Many featured women. Her painting of Jesus and St. John the Baptist was of them as a nursing infant and toddler respectively, with their mothers Mary and Elisabeth in conversation. Her The Baptism of Christ was painted for the Church of the Certosini in Bologna. Elisabetta Sirani opened a studio for women artists, a completely new idea for its time. At 27, Elisabetta Sirani came down with an unexplained illness. She lost weight and became depressed, though continued to work. She was ill from the spring through the summer and died in August. Bologna gave her a large and elegant public funeral. Elisabetta Siranis father blamed her maid for poisoning her; her body was exhumed and the cause of death determined to be a perforated stomach. Its likely that she had had gastric ulcers. Sirianis Virgin and Child on Stamps In 1994, a stamp featuring Siranis Virgin and Child painting was part of the United States Postal Services Christmas stamps. It was the first piece of historical art by a woman so featured.

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Dupont Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Dupont - Essay Example What is also significant to note that the organizations are considered as the artificial citizens of the world therefore they have an obligation to engage themselves into practices which can enhance the world in which they operate? This may therefore not only include following the sustainable business process and products but also engages into practices which can ensure the cooperation between the different stakeholders in the society. DuPont is one of the most famous organizations of the world with presence in many countries. Over the period of time, it has been able to develop itself into a firm which is socially responsible with clear set of goals for fulfilling the needs of the society. This paper will therefore focus on the role of DuPont in the society and how it has been able to fulfill its role specially in terms of serving the society, the stakeholders as well as the implications of the actions of the firm on its stakeholders. DuPont is an American chemical company with a rich and old history as it was formulated in late 19th century. Primarily engaged in chemical business, firm produces different products and is now the second largest chemical producing companies in the world. It has been able to completely revolutionize the way polymer products are being manufactured all over the world and has been able to introduce new and innovative technologies which helped it to obtain the leading position in the market. What is also important to note that over the period of time, DuPont has been able to create a strong brand image for itself such that most of the generic products in chemical industry are known with the brand names of this firm rather than their original generic name? Such acceptability of the products therefore suggests that the firm has been able to create a unique name in the world for itself. It is also however, important to note that various research studies have

Sunday, February 2, 2020

All Fungi Are Not the Same Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words - 1

All Fungi Are Not the Same - Essay Example Basidiomycota phylum develops through sexual means. Basidiospores are formed on club-shaped structures known as basidia. A terminal hyphal cell produces spores called basidium. In this phylum, asexual reproduction occurs, but occasionally. Some of its typical examples include the mushrooms rusts and toadstools. The Zygomycota phylum develops by both sexual and asexual means. They have thallus, which is composed of hyphae, which elongates through the growth of a tip. Multinucleate hyphae do not have septa except for the reproductive structures. When hyphae fuse, this directly leads to the formation of a zygote. In the process of zygote formation, meiosis occurs shortly before it germinates. The typical examples of the phylum include the Rhizopus commonly referred to as the black bread mold. As Vandenkoornhuyse, et al. (2002) observes, generally, fungi are eukaryotic organisms that are neither plants nor animals. As heterotrophic organisms that are devoid of chlorophyll, they obtain their nutrients through absorption. Glycogen is the primary carbohydrate stored in fungi. Fungi excrete enzymes into their food source and live within an external digestion. Ascomycota live in specific locations often forming symbiotic relationships with plant roots, stems, leaves and algae to obtain nutrients. Basidiomycota are mutualistic symbionts and obtain nutrients from living hosts, roots, vascular plants and insects. They obtain sugars and nutrients produced through photosynthesis. Zygomycota makes use of light regulation for its development and growth. Light directs the growth of structures and activates the metabolic pathways. Zygomycetes grow in a wide range of environments and temperatures, with some growing in aerobic conditions. However, most are terrestrial meaning that they g row in liquid culture, at salty concentrations and high water activities to obtain nutrients. They can also be found in decaying animal and

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Philosophys Study Of Value Axiology Essay

Philosophys Study Of Value Axiology Essay It follows from questions Q-Q of the interview that the price defines the current value of the object auctioned. The process of accepting or amending the price seems to be, at least to an extent, both irrational and random. How much irrational or how much rational is that process? To answer this question, we have to elucidate the nature of value. In philosophy, the study of value is called axiology, derived from the Greek (worth), and (the knowledge of). Axiology was developed a century ago, mainly by Paul Lapin (1902) and E. von Hartmann (1908). It focuses on two kinds of values: aesthetics and ethics. The former studies what beauty and harmony are, while the latter puts emphasis on what is wrong and what is right in the social conduct of individuals. A mathematical approach to this topic, resulting in formal axiology, is the brainchild of Robert S. Hartman (1967). Hartmans contribution is unique in the sense that his Formal Axiology is the only social science in which a one-to-one relationship exists between the dimensions of axiology and mathematics. If axiology is viewed as a collective name for aesthetics and ethics, it is similar to value theory. The latter teaches about the value of things. A thing in this context may be anything: an object, a person, or an idea. The study encompasses what people value, how they value it and why they value it. The results may be slightly different in the fields of philosophy, psychology, economics, or sociology. In the realm of psychology, value theory is applied to the study of how people are affected by their values. The object of study is how people develop a set of values, and how they subsequently profess and believe in these values. Even more important is how people act or fail to act on their values. The answer to the question how human behaviour may be guided, fail to be guided or be misguided by a set of values, or why people choose or prefer some things to others, or why and how certain values emerge at different stages of human physical and intellectual development, has not been found yet. Human beings are social animals and as such animals, they congregate in groups and communities. Each group or community may have its own values, usually different from the values and priorities of another community. The community values interact with personal values. The nature of the interaction and its impact on personal values or their change is the subject of sociological studies. Among prominent scientists who studied these topics, viewing value as an independent variable, we find Max Weber, Jà ¼rgen Habermas, or Émile Durkheim. Returning to the axiology view, the value can be viewed as relations between subjects and objects. Through these relations, the social, group, or individual evaluations of certain material, human or natural qualities are expressed in hierarchical and polarised forms. These forms fill ideals, needs, or desires adapted to the time and space in which they occur. Three levels can be distinguished in the determination of their essential type. They can be studied on the pragmatic level (Why?), on the syntactic level (How?), and on the semantic level (What?). Value is multidimensional: (more BS, p.1) For this purpose, Nadine (2003) defines an axiological system S = (M, à ¯Ã‚ Ã¢â‚¬Å", I), where M is the class of representative structures, à ¯Ã‚ Ã¢â‚¬Å" is the class of interdependent objects or other entities I is the class of interpretations (assignments) given to the structures. The system S can function in a number of ways, and subsystems can be associated to it. A complex axiological system may thus be generated. Nadin (2003) has derived the following operations and relations can be established between any two axiological systems S1 and S2: S1 is the subsystem of S2 S1 is complementary to S1 S1 and S2 are equal Union of S1 and S2 exists Intersection of S1 and S2 exists An empty system exists S1 and S2 are independent Similar relationships can be defined for the predicates. Nadine has also shown the categories and morphisms of the systems mentioned. ** ** ** ** ** The term creating value has an aura of mystery about itself. How do we create value? And, indeed, what is value? And how does it relate to luxury? These are the important questions that will be addressed in this chapter. A product attains the status of luxury good because of its unique intrinsic properties, such as design, performance, durability, quality and reliability. At least some of these properties must be perceived as considerably superior to comparable common substitutes. Quality The term value has been treated extensively in philosophy, as well as in economy. In spite of this, or perhaps because of it, there is no unified definition of value. There are definitions appropriate for the respective perspectives of value. Therefore, creating value may seem a sheer contradiction. The first approximation to understanding value is the realization that in many instances value is time, space and person dependent. For instance, Arabian horses were very valuable as recently as a century ago. But they were appreciated mainly by the male population, and only in those social circles that could afford owning an Arabian horse. Nowadays, with the car being the king of the road, owning a horse, even the most extraordinary one, is not a matter of prestige. This simple example illustrates that value is a perceived property. Its model necessarily must comprise at least some of the value categories: emotional, economic, and social. Among the components of the emotional category, most outstanding are beauty, durability, exclusiveness, and perhaps also a sense of belonging caused by the high cost of luxury. Each of these dimensions is complex enough to be scrutinized separately. Some people believe that beauty, whether in humans or in nature, obeys a mathematical law. Based on countless observations, it can be stated that living organisms, plants, animals, or human beings, grow according to a precise mathematical law given by the geometrical ratio of 1:1,618. It is called the Golden Ratio, or the Divine proportion, obtained by a precise mathematical procedure. Two quantities are in the Golden Ratio if their sum divided by the larger quantity is equal to 1,1618 (its reciprocal is 0,618). It is based on the Fibonacci Sequence, in which each member is a number obtained as the sum of the previous two number. By and by, any successive pair of the Fibonacci series will result in the ratio mentioned, called ÃŽÂ ¦. The interesting observation is that this ratio, ÃŽÂ ¦ = 1:1,1618, appears consistently in beautiful things in nature, architecture, the arts, or living beings. Many beautiful pictures illustrating the Phi, as well as explaining the secrets of the G olden Ratio, can be found at the Golden Ratio website. The logos of Atari, Nissan and Toyota, obeying the Golden Ratio law, the metric dimensions of paper formats, shells, credit cards, architectonic drawings, too, can be found at the Golden Ratio website. Some time ago, the press reported that Dr Marquardt, a facial surgeon from California, had constructed a mask of the human face based on ÃŽÂ ¦. This beautiful face displays the proportion everywhere: in the skull, the positioning of the eyes, the length of the nose, or the size of the teeth. The mask conforms to todays standards of beautiful faces, regardless of race. Moreover, it also agrees with pre-modern paintings, antique statues, or old-time movie stars. This might lead us to believe that facial beauty is invariant over time and across cultures. Is it then not tempting to conclude that beauty, quantified by a mathematical ratio, is not remarkable at all, that beauty is the property of the visible surface, and that philosophizing on what beauty means is a waste of time? Perhaps not quite yet. Beauty, indeed, is in the eyes of the beholder, but it goes beyond physical attractiveness, so intensely blared by the media and popular culture. Beauty in the context of luxury includes also authenticity, kindness, wisdom, happiness, love, dignity, and self-realization. The possibilities for the beautiful to be known have thus been extended infinitely. Because luxury may very well depend on this kind of beauty derived not only from physical objects, but also from human interaction perceived as valuable to a specific individual. Again, beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Durability, too, may have a great many meanings to different individuals. A general dictionary definition (Merriam-Webster, website) states that something that is durable is able to exist for a long time without significant deterioration. These terms are technical because, indeed, durability is most often of interest to engineers and businessmen. It refers to unchanged properties or performance of a product with reference to some environmental or application-related conditions. Most often, durability of industrial products is achieved or enhanced by a proper choice of materials, clever design, and surface treatment. Durability may be a preferred property of objects including luxury objects. For instance, gems or precious metals are durable. The durability is given by their resistance to environmental influences, which is an inherent property of these materials. Durability is further corroborated by their aesthetic features. Non-objects, for instance luxury holidays, or sumptuous meals, can hardly be durable longer than what is acceptable, which is a relatively short time. Exclusiveness is a perceived property per se, but it may also be viewed as a component of durability. Exclusiveness is predominantly a product of craftsmanship applied to luxury items. This is what gives a luxury item a life. A mass-produced item, no matter how beautiful, lacks the touch of the spirit of its creator, and never makes the same impression as a hand-made object. Personalized production, combined with exquisite design, makes luxury objects invariant in time, and resistant to fashion fluctuations. Because luxury items are not available to everyone, the narrow segment of the population that can afford them makes up a virtual club. The sheer belonging to the club tickles many peoples imagination about the social status or importance they acquire if the public associates them with the exclusive club. It may or may not be so. The economic aspects of luxury seem to be simple to grasp. Luxury costs a lot of money. That is the simple conclusion most people would be tempted to draw. The actual relationships holding between luxury objects and their users are, however, vastly more complex. In the realm of economics, human beings are viewed as consumers. Their revealed preferences for various goods are considered indicators of the fact that those goods are of value. Self-evident as this statement may sound, it generates a contradiction between various political or religious influences, and a struggle over what goods should be available on the market. Market goods must be owned, if the market system is to provide information on the consensus on certain essential questions concerning individual and society, and the ecosystems affected by the market transactions. The term market goods is too constrained, as the taxonomy of goods is much more complex. First, a distinction has to be made between moral and material goods. Moral goods is anything a person is expected to be morally obligated to strive for. The study of this kind of goods belongs to the realm of ethics. People and their conduct may thus deserve praise or blame in a given system. Natural goods is any kind of goods that is palpable. The discipline that deals with natural goods is economics. Luxury goods, too, are natural goods. A complement to this is the distinction between moral and non-moral goods. A non-moral good is something that one or more individuals desire. A non-moral good may include moral goods, but includes predominantly material goods. There is a mental distinction between these two views of goods. If one says: Fred is a good pianist, and This meal was very good, the meaning of the qualifier good is not interchangeable. It has a different sense: accomplished in the former case, and delicious in the latter. Another important distinction is that between economic goods and moral goods. The former is anything that stimulates economic growth. So, for instance, alcohol has an exchange value in that it stimulates economic growth. Thus, alcohol is economically good. Since there are circumstances when it may be harmful to a persons body, and even have a negative social effect, alcohol can hardly ever be regarded as a moral goods. Several other taxonomies exist. To value, in the realm of goods, means to determine an essential type of goods, decide that things are in some relation to each other, and that one thing is better than another. Thus, to value is to prioritize. Valuations in the sense of assigning higher value to some things and lower value to other things, is a consistent pattern of deciding what is good. Being a persons manner of thinking, it is strictly individual. The manner in which a person reaches conclusions about things, and the unique pattern of thinking and assigning value is called the Value Structure. Its principal components comprise thinking about objects, discerning their different aspects, making judgment and choosing, in other words, it involves the processes of filtering, storing, and analyzing data. *** However, as the real luxury market moves into the stratosphere, its leaving open a vast universe in which mass marketers can fulfill the neo-luxury desires of mass consumers. And these consuming masses have shown strong evidence they are ready, willing and able to pay premium prices for products and services that were once considered commodities. From ice cream to bottled water, beer to potato chips, coffee to coffee pots, washing machines to power saws, there isnt a mass-market category that hasnt jumped onto the up-branding bandwagon-and a very wise jump it is. Adding a premium product to an already strong brand name is a great way to drive brand growth and drive up margins. In fact, it can cast a positive halo over the entire brand family of products, making them all seem worth more. While this incredible market opportunity was recognized most presciently by brands such as Target and Trader Joes, its no longer a trend. Thanks to the internet and other media channels, consumers have changed too: People are more informed and more worldly-wise than ever before. Theres greater awareness of whats sophisticated, whats hot and, more important, whats cool. Having long satisfied their need for the basics, midlevel American consumers are no longer content with midlevel products and services. With basic water needs satisfied, for example, American consumers want Evian, Deja Blue, Glaceau or any bottled-water brand carried in Patagonia water pouches by athletes, movie stars and politicians. Consumers may get hungry, but no basic burger will do: Nieman Ranch beef cooked on one of Frontgates sleekest grills followed by a Tassimo espresso is the only way upbranders will go. Some even think theyll be loved far better if they use Olay Regenerist and Crest Vivid White and launder their Victoria Secrets in Whirlpool Duets. On another level, given all the stresses of the world, there seems to be an increasing desire to take care of me. People want a bit of luxury however they can get it. Starbucks, early on, recognized that while not everyone can afford to go to Tiffanys, they can enjoy the small indulgence of a grande nonfat latte. The coffee costs $5-a small price to pay to treat oneself well.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Documentary films Essay

Documentary films have paved way to show the reality of life. More often than not, it provides awareness of the present situation that was not addressed accurately in films and television shows alike. Documentary, like other discourses of the real, retains a vestigial responsibility to describe and interpret the world of collective experience, a responsibility that is no small matter at all (Nichols, 1991 p. 10). In making a documentary film concerning the community life in a distant foreign country, several issues would need to be addressed. The first thing that we need to discuss is the culture of the people living in that place. It would be an important factor as it tells a lot about the people and the place itself. Its history would generally be included in determining how the culture came about. Social norms and practices should also thoroughly discuss to identify the difference and uniqueness of their society. Furthermore, the documentation should explore the different beliefs of the people and how it affects the way they live and how their society copes up with modernization. The main focus of the documentary is how the culture and beliefs would affect the health of the people in that certain area. It would thoroughly explore the different misconceptions and traditional health management that these people have. This is a critical issue to discuss because it may directly or indirectly affect their socio-economic progress and their lifestyle. If by chance, the documentary could discover the need to re-educate the people regarding their health beliefs and fallacy, then proper authority should be inform. This is to insure that people would have the opportunity and the appropriate resources to improve their knowledge as regards to their health condition. REFERENCES Nichols, B. (1991), Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary, Indiana University Press, p. 10

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Capturing the Readers Attention with Literature from...

Let the Great World Spin and A Rose for Emily, are able to capture the reactions of people in extreme circumstances. We can see the writing style of both McCann and Faulkner and how they capture the reader’s attention and give us the desire to continue reading. Looking into the background of Colum McCann, the writer of Let the Great World Spin, you can see how he is able to write from so many points of view. At a young age he studied journalism in the former College of Commerce in Rathmines, now the Dublin Institute of Technology in Ireland. His first job out of college was reporting for the Irish Press, which was the national newspaper of Ireland. By the age of 21 he already noticed as an incredible writer and was given his own column. Then in 1986 he arrived in the United States to pursue a different hobby, other than writing for a newspaper. He came to the United States with the intent of becoming a novelist. He however soon found out that he did not have the life experienc e and the knowledge of other peoples backgrounds to write a novel, so for 18 months he took a bicycle tour across North America, gaining knowledge of others’ experiences learning how different walks of life of people lived. He later said that the influence that these people gave him helped his fiction, by adding to the wide range of voices and backgrounds of his characters. After going on his extremely inspirational bicycle tour he settled in Texas for four years where he worked for a program for